Reports, Publications and Research

Our Reports

Noah’s Ark has recently made two submissions, one on the Victorian State Disability Plan and the other on a discussion paper by the NDIA on children with autism spectrum.

Our recommendations about the State Disability Plan include that it needs to have a much stronger focus on children and specifically recognise their rights; that with the introduction of the NDIS there needs to be a strong focus on connecting children with disabilities and state services, practically and at a policy level; and that the Plan needs a specific focus on improving inclusive education in Victoria.

The submission can be found here.

Our recommendations to the NDIA about children with autism spectrum include that the NDIA should not be discussing funding models based on disability type, rather than function; that the approach needs to support both the development of the child and the capacity and wellbeing of the family; that a renewed focus on integrated policies and outcomes across various levels of government, and specialist and mainstream services are needed; and that a comprehensive approach to developing a skilled workforce is required.

The submission can be found here.

Noah’s Ark submitted two responses to consultation papers on changes to the NDIS. Our response to the consultation on young children and their families highlighted the need for an NDIS which was more focused on early development and integrated with other children’s services. We have advised that the introduction of Independent Assessments should approached cautiously. Thanks to the staff who contributed our internal consultations for the development of these papers.

The links to the papers are:
The ECEI Reset – Young children and families
Independent Assessments and Planning

Noah’s Ark provided a Response to the proposed new guidelines for the Inclusion Support Program. The guidelines have proposed two new categories of children be supported, including children presenting with learning, language and speech delays and children who do not meet developmental targets under the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC).

The full report can be found here.

Noah’s Ark welcomes the opportunity to comment on the Legislative Assembly Legal and Social Issues Committee’s inquiry into early childhood engagement with CALD communities.

The submission is available to read here.

Noah’s Ark welcomes the opportunity to comment on the discussion paper ‘Improving the NDIS Experience: Establishing a Participant Service Guarantee and removing legislative red tape’.

The submission is available to read here.

Noah’s Ark has had another submission put forward to the Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme. This submission is in three parts.

The first part outlines the problems emerging from the adult-centric design of the NDIS. The second part of this submission directly responds to the questions raised by the Joint Standing Committee on the NDIS and the third part illustrates the discussion through two case studies.

The submission is available to read here.

Noah’s Ark has submitted a second submission to the review of thin markets for the NDIA. This additional submission specifically discusses the importance of teachers in Early Childhood Intervention and the need to look at funding teams in rural areas differently because of the small numbers of children with a disability. The submission is available to read here.

Noah’s Ark is committed to building stronger relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and organisations and to providing respectful, responsive and culturally relevant services. In 2017, we launched our Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) 2016-2017. Read our RAP.

The Family Exit Interview Report 2017 (previously Family Feedback) continues to be an important component of Noah’s Arks continuous improvement system. This report outlines the findings from interviews completed with families who exited Noah’s Ark services from April to December 2016. For the first time, the Family Exit Interviews include feedback from families who accessed both ECI and National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) services. Read the The Family Exit Interview Report 2018.

COPM was adopted by Noah’s Ark in 2012 as a measure of the performance and quality of early intervention services. Read Canadian_Occupational_Performance_Measure_Report_2018

Noah’s Ark is committed to providing detailed information about our services, organisation and financial performance in our annual reports. View our latest Annual Report 2018.

In 2013, Noah’s Ark developed a Family Survey, based on the Office of Special Education’s Family Outcomes Survey. In 2016, we reviewed our Quality Assurance System and replaced the Noah’s Ark Family Survey with the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised (FOS-R). The FOS-R along with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Family Exit Interviews are used to inform Noah’s Ark Quality Assurance.  Read the Family_Outcomes_Survey_Report_2018.

Noah’s Ark recently adopted the Routines Based Interview (RBI) to support Key Workers to fully understand the family environment, conduct a functional assessment of child and family needs and develop clear specific, measurable goals that directly address the family’s priorities and help children develop skills relevant to everyday life. In April this year, families participated in an RBI Bootcamp to support the training of all our managers in this tool. This report is the feedback the families gave after participating in an RBI. Read the RBI Bootcamp Parent Feedback Report 2016.

Our Publications and Research

Gavidia-Payne, S. (2020). Implementation of Australia’s National Disability Insurance Scheme: Experiences of families of young children with disabilities. Infants & Young Children, 33(3), 184-194.

McWilliam, R. A., Boavida, T., Bull, K., Cañadas, M., Hwang, A. W., Józefacka, N., … & Woodward, J. (2020). The Routines-Based Model Internationally Implemented. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(22), 8308.

Moore, T., Forster, J., & Bull, K. (2019). Supporting Parental Choice: The impact of a funding model. In International perspectives on early intervention, early childhood special education. (YEC Monograph Series No 18). Washington DC: Division for Early Childhood.

Forster, J. (2017). Development of Community based services for children with disabilities and their families. In Early Childhood Intervention: Working with Families of Young Children with Special Needs. Eds. Sukkar, Dunst & Kirby. Routledge. London

Velluci, D. (2016). Transdisciplinary Practice Position Paper. The Speech Pathology Association of Australia Ltd.

Alexander, S. (2016). Transdisciplinary Practice in Early Childhood Intervention. Noah’s Ark Inc. Malvern, Victoria.

Webster, A. (2016).  Working in Early Childhood Settings: Self-reflection Tool, Noah’s Ark Inc. Malvern, Victoria.

Forster, J. (2013). Intervention, Individualisation and Insurance: Who is the ‘I’ who will benefit? Noah’s Ark Inc. Malvern, Victoria.

Forster, J., & Alexander, S. (2013). The Key Worker: Resources for Early Childhood Intervention Professionals. ECII.

Webster, A., & Forster, J. (2012). Participating and Belonging: Inclusion in Practice. Noah’s Ark Inc. Malvern, Victoria

2015-16
Australian Inclusion Support Consultancy Project

This project commenced in 2014.The project aims to clarify our understanding of how best to support the inclusion of young children with disabilities in early childhood education and care services in an Australian context.

The project is being conducted in the following stages:

  1. Consultation with educators and staff in children’s services in receipt of consultancy support services.
  2. Review of the Australian literature.
  3. Review of the international literature.
  4. Development of a Draft Australian Framework for Inclusion Consultancy.
  5. Pilot testing/action research to test the validity of the draft Framework.
  6. Publication of results.
  7. Implementation through online training.

The first two stages of the project are complete.  Stage 3 is currently underway.

 

2012-2015
The Transdisciplinary Key Worker

This research commenced in 2012 and has examined the parameters of the best practice transdisciplinary Key Worker approach to Early Childhood Intervention (ECI).

The research has examined the literature, developed a clear role for ECI professionals; determined what effective transdisciplinary practice looks like and what skills and qualities are important to look for and build in staff and teams and the structures that are required to support this way of working.

The findings of the research have been built into our Key Worker Online Course and are being factored into our future organisational planning.

2015-16
Australian Inclusion Support Consultancy Project

This project commenced in 2014.The project aims to clarify our understanding of how best to support the inclusion of young children with disabilities in early childhood education and care services in an Australian context.

The project is being conducted in the following stages:

  1. Consultation with educators and staff in children’s services in receipt of consultancy support services.
  2. Review of the Australian literature.
  3. Review of the international literature.
  4. Development of a Draft Australian Framework for Inclusion Consultancy.
  5. Pilot testing/action research to test the validity of the draft Framework.
  6. Publication of results.
  7. Implementation through online training.

The first two stages of the project are complete.  Stage 3 is currently underway.

 

2012-2015
The Transdisciplinary Key Worker

This research commenced in 2012 and has examined the parameters of the best practice transdisciplinary Key Worker approach to Early Childhood Intervention (ECI).

The research has examined the literature, developed a clear role for ECI professionals; determined what effective transdisciplinary practice looks like and what skills and qualities are important to look for and build in staff and teams and the structures that are required to support this way of working.

The findings of the research have been built into our Key Worker Online Course and are being factored into our future organisational planning.

 

2015
Children with ASD Online Training

This project is being undertaken for the Victorian Department of Education and Training and involves the development of a stand-alone online course for educators in early childhood services working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Want to work with us?

We have vacancies in a range of roles including Occupational Therapists and Speech Pathologists.

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